Reverse the Clock

reverse clockVisits with an old friend used to revive only memories of good times. Now we discuss those who’ve died and those reluctantly poised at the door. When did all my loved ones get old?

Across the table we’re transported to the ages we were upon first meeting. Not a day has passed since laughter of a decades old conversation rolls into current table talk. The waiter shows up too often, interrupting tales more important than food.

Yet old drinking habits are tempered and bedtime beckons far sooner than dawn’s early light.

For those who’ve passed, we raise a glass. Behind silent sips we count our blessings: one for each day lived, and one for each which remains; one for each friend lost, and one for each yet to be met.

At the close we vow to make our next visit soon.

But soon enough?

raise a glass

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In the spirit of my writing class projects for Year of the Book, here’s the first draft (below) of this entry for my memoir Perfect Isn’t.  I trimmed about 15% between the two versions… even in a vignette which now spans less than 150 words.  Your comments and suggestions welcome!  And of course, I’d love to hear about the writing projects YOU’RE undertaking.  Leave me a note below.  I hope you write with JOY!

If you’d like to download the Character Profile worksheets I created for my students, you can get them HERE for FREE!

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Making Time for What Matters

A visit with an old friend used to be something that brought back only memories of “good old days.” Now it leads to discussions of those who’ve died and those we’ve known who are currently knocking at death’s door.
How did all my loved ones get to be old?

As I sit across the table we’re both transported magically to the ages we each were when we met. There’s not a day passed since the laughter of a decades old conversation rolls into our current table talk.

The waiter shows up too often, interrupting stories more important than food. Yet our old drinking habits are more restrained and bedtime beckons far sooner than dawn’s early light.

For those who’ve passed, we raise a glass, and behind silent sips we count our blessings. One for each day which remains lived, and one for each which remains. One for each friend lost, and one for each we’ve yet to meet.

And At the close we vow to make our next visit soon. But soon enough?

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4 thoughts on “Reverse the Clock

  1. I so relate, Demi! I have lunch with three friends from childhood, and one of the friends lost her husband in November, 2013! The loss motivates us to bond even more fiercely than ever before. We like to believe our plans will ensure not only manifestation go goals and dreams, but somehow, we view planning as a glue ensuring our permanence, immortality! Alas, the illusion is shattered by more obituary notices of classmates!

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